How do you 10x your results in anything?

 

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Feel the keys tap-tap-tapping away. Work is supposed to fulfill you. The only way that’s done is if you relish each brush stroke. Each pen stroke, each word. Craft with presence.

I was listening to Tim Ferriss talk about marketing. He always hears, How do I market my work better? How do I reach more people? How do I, how do I, how do I?

Start by having great content. Start by being present in the process. If you’re just doing it to make millions, if you just want the likes, why the fuck are you doing it?

You’re going to be terrible if everything is externally motivated. Once you find out that writer’s don’t actually make the millions you dream of, you falter. Once you realize your passion for sketching and painting is only half the reason for doing it, you’ve lost. Because if you already have the idea to be the next Picasso or Goethe, you’ll never get there. You get tunnel vision. You start to see the goal, and you stop thinking about now. You think that any amount of hours directly correlate to improvement.

I’ve pumped out posts over the past few months. Note: pumped out. Not lovingly crafted. That’s changing. Because I remember why I started blogging every day: I actually like to write. I feel myself subconsciously avoiding mistakes I would’ve made just a few months ago. I don’t know what I’m avoiding, what I’m not doing, but I feel more fluid. I feel better. 

The hours are important. But it’s the type of hours that is most important. Crank out ten hours half paying attention and your work might even degrade. Over the past few months as my heart started to sink out of my writing, I got progressively less and less likes. It was felt by the readers. Putting out the same number of posts didn’t mean shit. People didn’t like them because I didn’t even want to write the fucking things.

If I don’t want to write it, how can I expect you to read it?

Conscious, present hours is what improves your craft. Being wholly present as you type each key. Feeling the type-written words shadow what’s on the inside of your heart.

And this applies to sport. To habits, practices, and skills. I just got into rock climbing and I’ve been asking people around my gym what they climb, whether they compete, and what they do to train — being the competitive young cunt that I am, everyone will gradually steer clear of me by the end of the month.

I was talking to an Asian guy yesterday — he was staff at the gym. Wearing some long work out pants, a t-shirt, and… Alright, I have to start a whole new sentence to give it justice.

Actually, a whole new paragraph. This guy had a black hairband, and an Asian man bun that had a flourish of hair sticking out of it. Dude looked like a samurai. It was beautiful. As the proud owner of a man bun myself, I had to pay compliment. He appreciated it. There’s just a connection you have with fellow man-bunners — it’s like the universe showing balance when you greet and appreciate another’s artfully made bun.

Anyway, this guy climbs V11’s. As in I climb V4’s right now, I’ve hit a couple V5’s, and it takes me serious effort to even get in the starting position on V6’s.

He doesn’t even compete. He climbs for fun.

And I was like. Hmm. I’m climbing right now because I love climbing. That’s why I get into anything — I develop an addiction. But maybe, even though I love hitting random routes, I’m still too end-oriented. Maybe stop asking about the competitions, maybe stop thinking about climbing more and more difficult routes. Maybe just be.

The problem with always aiming for something is you will never get there. You might hit the goal, but I’m talking of a deeper cognitive error — once you start getting involved with end-points, it will never stop. They will shift, and you’re always running for an esoteric end game that doesn’t exist — it’s mind made.

Focus on the process. Watch not only your self-peace soar because you’re content with where you are, but watch your results 10x. The funny thing is, when you’re focused on what you’re doing right now, and not on how good you can be, your productivity and skill-set spike. Massively. And results naturally follow.

Love the process while you learn — it’s how you surpass the competition.

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